• Sun. Apr 14th, 2024

At least 174 people were killed and approximately 180 others were injured as supporters swarmed the pitch, causing a frenzy that forced authorities to use tear gas. The toll had increased from 127 earlier in the day.
The event occurred following the conclusion of a football match between Arema FC and Persebaya Surabaya in the East Java region on Saturday night. According to East Java police commander Nico Afinta, supporters of the losing side swarmed the pitch minutes after the final whistle and police were spotted firing tear gas, causing a rush and incidents of suffocation.
Arema FC fans invaded the pitch late after their club fell 3-2 to Persebaya Surabaya, their first loss to their bitter foe in more than two decades, at the Kanjuruhan stadium in the eastern city of Malang. Police, who described the commotion as “riots,” attempted to encourage spectators to return to the stands, and several were seen beating up people in riot gear. Two cops were among those killed in what seems to be one of the deadliest stadium tragedies in history.
According to authorities, 34 people died inside the stadium, while others perished in a neighbouring hospital, and many individuals were crushed and smothered as they hurried to escape.
There have been prior outbreaks of disturbance at matches in Indonesia, according to officials, with a strong rivalry between teams often leading to violence among spectators.
The Indonesian government apologised for the event and vowed to examine the circumstances behind the stampede, according to AFP.
“We apologise for this occurrence” “This is a regretful act that ‘injures’ our sport at a time when fans may watch football matches from the stadium,” Indonesian Sports and Youth Minister Zainudin Amali told Kompas.
After conflicts between supporters and police, Indonesian President Joko Widodo ordered a safety assessment of the country’s football events on Sunday.
Widodo directed the country’s sports and youth minister, national police director, and Indonesian football association leader to “perform a thorough examination of football matches and security measures.”
On Sunday morning, torched cars, including a police van, littered the streets around the stadium. According to police, a total of 13 automobiles were damaged.
The stadium, which houses 42,000 people, was supposed to be sold out. According to police, 3,000 people swarmed the pitch.
The Football Association of Indonesia (PSSI) stopped football matches for one week, barred Arema FC from hosting home games for the rest of the season, and announced that an investigative team would be sent to Malang to determine the reason for the crush.

174 people were killed and over 100 were injured in an Indonesia stadium stampede; the president has ordered an investigation.

ByJosh Taylor

Oct 2, 2022

At least 174 people were killed and approximately 180 others were injured as supporters swarmed the pitch, causing a frenzy that forced authorities to use tear gas. The toll had increased from 127 earlier in the day.
The event occurred following the conclusion of a football match between Arema FC and Persebaya Surabaya in the East Java region on Saturday night. According to East Java police commander Nico Afinta, supporters of the losing side swarmed the pitch minutes after the final whistle and police were spotted firing tear gas, causing a rush and incidents of suffocation.
Arema FC fans invaded the pitch late after their club fell 3-2 to Persebaya Surabaya, their first loss to their bitter foe in more than two decades, at the Kanjuruhan stadium in the eastern city of Malang. Police, who described the commotion as “riots,” attempted to encourage spectators to return to the stands, and several were seen beating up people in riot gear. Two cops were among those killed in what seems to be one of the deadliest stadium tragedies in history.
According to authorities, 34 people died inside the stadium, while others perished in a neighbouring hospital, and many individuals were crushed and smothered as they hurried to escape.
There have been prior outbreaks of disturbance at matches in Indonesia, according to officials, with a strong rivalry between teams often leading to violence among spectators.
The Indonesian government apologised for the event and vowed to examine the circumstances behind the stampede, according to AFP.
“We apologise for this occurrence” “This is a regretful act that ‘injures’ our sport at a time when fans may watch football matches from the stadium,” Indonesian Sports and Youth Minister Zainudin Amali told Kompas.
After conflicts between supporters and police, Indonesian President Joko Widodo ordered a safety assessment of the country’s football events on Sunday.
Widodo directed the country’s sports and youth minister, national police director, and Indonesian football association leader to “perform a thorough examination of football matches and security measures.”
On Sunday morning, torched cars, including a police van, littered the streets around the stadium. According to police, a total of 13 automobiles were damaged.
The stadium, which houses 42,000 people, was supposed to be sold out. According to police, 3,000 people swarmed the pitch.
The Football Association of Indonesia (PSSI) stopped football matches for one week, barred Arema FC from hosting home games for the rest of the season, and announced that an investigative team would be sent to Malang to determine the reason for the crush.