• Sun. Apr 14th, 2024

Days after being criticized by the administration in Islamabad, Imran Khan further emphasized that he was being misunderstood: Imran Khan, a former prime minister, responded to criticism over his anti-army comments on Sunday by asserting that his party wants the Pakistan Army to be “strong” and that his “constructive” criticism was not meant to harm the formidable force. He also called for early elections to end the political impasse in the nation.
The 70-year-old leader of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf led his supporters toward Islamabad on the third day of his lengthy march known as the “Haqeeqi Azadi March” while addressing them at several locations and criticizing his rivals for alleged corruption.
Khan emphasized to his fans that his criticism of the status quo had been productive.
My constructive criticism is not [mean] to hurt the army; I want it to be strong because we need a strong force, he insisted.
Days after receiving criticism from the government for his anti-army attitude, which made headlines in Pakistan and India, Khan also emphasized that he had been misinterpreted.
“India don’t misunderstand, we stand with our army,” he continued, referring to the neighboring country’s apparent support for the army and Imran Khan after Lt. Gen. Nadeem Anjum of the ISI’s press briefing.
I can never be against this army because it is ours, I want to tell India, he remarked.
Until recently, the strong army, which has controlled the coup-prone nation for more than half of its more than 75-year history, had significant influence over security and foreign affairs.
Khan acknowledged this week that he extended Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa’s contract in March despite the opposition’s attempt to overthrow his administration.
Khan made his comments following the ISI head’s historic Thursday press conference in which he disclosed that the army chief had received a “lucrative offer” for an indefinite extension of his position in March.
In his speech at Sadhoki, Khan stated, “If establishment believes that we should help these crooks, if you have decided to back these thieves, then sorry myself and this nation cannot accept this decision.
Khan also denied as “untrue” Shehbaz Sharif’s assertions that the opposition leader had written to him requesting input on the choice of the army chief and the election.
In his speech at Muridke, Khan remarked, “Shehbaz Sharif, you issued a statement that I sent a message to you saying we should sit down and discuss about the army commander… see Shehbaz Sharif listen to me, I don’t talk to boot polishers.”
According to Prime Minister Sharif, he firmly rejected a recommendation from his predecessor about the choice of General Bajwa’s replacement as Army head.
In response to Shehbaz, Khan asked, “What is the advantage of speaking with you? What have you got to say? He claimed that the method you came to power involved begging the Americans at first, hiding in a car trunk later, and polishing boots last.
With the words, “We merely want fair and transparent elections and we would accept whatever the people of Pakistan decide,” Khan restated his party’s call for free and fair elections. Additionally, he requested that the chief justice establish the rule of law. ” He begged the chief justice to “put these people who are sitting on top of the law, under the law.
He also brought up the alleged abuse of Shahbaz Gill and Azam Swati when they were in his party’s custody, for which he has been blaming the army and calling for an investigation.
He made a subliminal allusion to the potent army by saying, “No institution is authorized to break the law of this country.”

Imran Khan Clarifies: “India Don’t Misunderstand, We Stand with Our Army.”

ByJosh Taylor

Oct 31, 2022

Days after being criticized by the administration in Islamabad, Imran Khan further emphasized that he was being misunderstood: Imran Khan, a former prime minister, responded to criticism over his anti-army comments on Sunday by asserting that his party wants the Pakistan Army to be “strong” and that his “constructive” criticism was not meant to harm the formidable force. He also called for early elections to end the political impasse in the nation.
The 70-year-old leader of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf led his supporters toward Islamabad on the third day of his lengthy march known as the “Haqeeqi Azadi March” while addressing them at several locations and criticizing his rivals for alleged corruption.
Khan emphasized to his fans that his criticism of the status quo had been productive.
My constructive criticism is not [mean] to hurt the army; I want it to be strong because we need a strong force, he insisted.
Days after receiving criticism from the government for his anti-army attitude, which made headlines in Pakistan and India, Khan also emphasized that he had been misinterpreted.
“India don’t misunderstand, we stand with our army,” he continued, referring to the neighboring country’s apparent support for the army and Imran Khan after Lt. Gen. Nadeem Anjum of the ISI’s press briefing.
I can never be against this army because it is ours, I want to tell India, he remarked.
Until recently, the strong army, which has controlled the coup-prone nation for more than half of its more than 75-year history, had significant influence over security and foreign affairs.
Khan acknowledged this week that he extended Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa’s contract in March despite the opposition’s attempt to overthrow his administration.
Khan made his comments following the ISI head’s historic Thursday press conference in which he disclosed that the army chief had received a “lucrative offer” for an indefinite extension of his position in March.
In his speech at Sadhoki, Khan stated, “If establishment believes that we should help these crooks, if you have decided to back these thieves, then sorry myself and this nation cannot accept this decision.
Khan also denied as “untrue” Shehbaz Sharif’s assertions that the opposition leader had written to him requesting input on the choice of the army chief and the election.
In his speech at Muridke, Khan remarked, “Shehbaz Sharif, you issued a statement that I sent a message to you saying we should sit down and discuss about the army commander… see Shehbaz Sharif listen to me, I don’t talk to boot polishers.”
According to Prime Minister Sharif, he firmly rejected a recommendation from his predecessor about the choice of General Bajwa’s replacement as Army head.
In response to Shehbaz, Khan asked, “What is the advantage of speaking with you? What have you got to say? He claimed that the method you came to power involved begging the Americans at first, hiding in a car trunk later, and polishing boots last.
With the words, “We merely want fair and transparent elections and we would accept whatever the people of Pakistan decide,” Khan restated his party’s call for free and fair elections. Additionally, he requested that the chief justice establish the rule of law. ” He begged the chief justice to “put these people who are sitting on top of the law, under the law.
He also brought up the alleged abuse of Shahbaz Gill and Azam Swati when they were in his party’s custody, for which he has been blaming the army and calling for an investigation.
He made a subliminal allusion to the potent army by saying, “No institution is authorized to break the law of this country.”