• Sun. Apr 14th, 2024

In India, an investigation into tainted medications is being carried out by the federal authority and the state regulator of the northern Haryana state. According to the WHO statement, the four medications are Indian-made cough and cold syrups.

The Gambia has begun a door-to-door campaign to demand the urgent withdrawal of cough and cold medications produced in India, which are to blame for the deaths of more than 60 children in the West African nation. The ministry of health has sent hundreds of young people on a house-to-house effort to collect the questionable syrups while collaborating with the Gambia Red Cross Society.

The children’s deaths from acute renal damage were verified by Mustapha Bittaye, the Gambia’s director of health, according to the Associated Press.
In response to the fatalities, the World Health Organization issued a medical alert, classifying four medications produced by the Haryana-based Maiden Pharmaceuticals Limited as substandard medical products Promethazine Oral Solution.

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said on Wednesday that four tainted medications found in The Gambia had been the subject of a medical product alert and may have been responsible for 66 infant deaths and severe renal damage.

According to him, the loss of young life is unbearably devastating for their families.
The four goods have been discovered in The Gambia, according to the UN health agency notice, but they may have been spread through unofficial markets to other nations or regions.

WHO advised that to protect patients from additional harm, all nations should identify and halt the distribution of these items.

We recently hospitalized a youngster with this illness (acute renal damage), however, she passed away. Before she visited our facility, we were able to confirm that she had consumed one of the medicines thought to be the cause of this. The council stated in a statement that it had been purchased at a drugstore located in The Gambia.
The medicine has been shown to have a sizable quantity of poison that permanently harms the kidneys.

According to Reuters, a top official at Maiden Pharmaceuticals stated that the business is attempting to get information from its buyer in the Gambia on the deaths of infants.
According to one of its directors, Naresh Kumar Goyal, who spoke to Reuters, Given that the issue suddenly surfaced this morning about the buyer and other factors, we are trying to figure out what went wrong. We have nothing to sell in India.

The Gambia quickly recalls cough syrups produced in India after 66 child fatalities were reported.

ByJosh Taylor

Oct 7, 2022

In India, an investigation into tainted medications is being carried out by the federal authority and the state regulator of the northern Haryana state. According to the WHO statement, the four medications are Indian-made cough and cold syrups.

The Gambia has begun a door-to-door campaign to demand the urgent withdrawal of cough and cold medications produced in India, which are to blame for the deaths of more than 60 children in the West African nation. The ministry of health has sent hundreds of young people on a house-to-house effort to collect the questionable syrups while collaborating with the Gambia Red Cross Society.

The children’s deaths from acute renal damage were verified by Mustapha Bittaye, the Gambia’s director of health, according to the Associated Press.
In response to the fatalities, the World Health Organization issued a medical alert, classifying four medications produced by the Haryana-based Maiden Pharmaceuticals Limited as substandard medical products Promethazine Oral Solution.

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said on Wednesday that four tainted medications found in The Gambia had been the subject of a medical product alert and may have been responsible for 66 infant deaths and severe renal damage.

According to him, the loss of young life is unbearably devastating for their families.
The four goods have been discovered in The Gambia, according to the UN health agency notice, but they may have been spread through unofficial markets to other nations or regions.

WHO advised that to protect patients from additional harm, all nations should identify and halt the distribution of these items.

We recently hospitalized a youngster with this illness (acute renal damage), however, she passed away. Before she visited our facility, we were able to confirm that she had consumed one of the medicines thought to be the cause of this. The council stated in a statement that it had been purchased at a drugstore located in The Gambia.
The medicine has been shown to have a sizable quantity of poison that permanently harms the kidneys.

According to Reuters, a top official at Maiden Pharmaceuticals stated that the business is attempting to get information from its buyer in the Gambia on the deaths of infants.
According to one of its directors, Naresh Kumar Goyal, who spoke to Reuters, Given that the issue suddenly surfaced this morning about the buyer and other factors, we are trying to figure out what went wrong. We have nothing to sell in India.